Strong religious women: Heroines and the “heart” of the church

International Women’s Day on 8 March honours the indispensable efforts of women and campaigns for their rights. The focus of this day is less on the about 660,000 women worldwide who have dedicated their entire lives to serving their fellow humans: religious sisters.

During the Lenten and Easter season, the pontifical foundation Aid to the Church in Need (ACN) directs the attention of the public to these extraordinary women and calls for support.

“What would the church and society be without religious sisters,” the Executive President of ACN, Dr Thomas Heine-Geldern, commented. “This is true in many countries: when the government breaks down and all organisations leave because of the tense security situation – the religious sisters are the ones who stay.”

Kindergartens, orphanages, schools, medical facilities and parishes would be unthinkable without them. Not to mention their prayers for the concerns of the world: Pope Francis has called the religious sisters the “praying heart” of the church. “Anyone who has put their faith in the prayers of the religious sisters in a time of personal need knows how uplifting it is to be spiritually sustained and supported,” Heine-Geldern said.

Aid for 11,000 religious sisters in 85 countries

ACN supports about 11,000 religious sisters in 85 countries around the world. “Besides funding charitable activities, this includes granting subsistence aid – for example in eastern Europe, where the sisters have no source of income at all,” explained ACN Project Director Regina Lynch.

Other main areas of support are the formation of young religious sisters, rebuilding projects in countries in which convents have been destroyed through war or natural disasters and aid for transportation projects.

“As every employee of ACN who visits one of our project countries can confirm: without religious sisters, it would be impossible to carry out the work of the church under the most difficult circumstances. They are heroines – who do not shy away from either persecution or death,” Lynch said. Each year, the aid organisation receives tragic reports of religious sisters who have been killed in service.

The motto of ACN’s Lenten and Easter campaign is: “Extraordinary women. Thanks to God. Thanks to you.” The campaign gives religious sisters from all over the world the opportunity to talk about their vocations and their lives in prayer and community as well as their work for those most in need.

“The religious sisters are heroines of faith and charity,” explained ACN President Heine-Geldern. “They bear witness of the vitality and strength that comes from a life serving God and those around us. ACN is proud to be able to support these outstanding women.”

 

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ACN supports the video of Pope Francis’s to pray for people who are persecuted for their faith

Rome/Königstein, 5 March 2019 – The March edition of the pope’s video is dedicated to the persecuted Christians who live in countries that do not guarantee religious freedom and human rights. The video is produced by the Pope’s Worldwide Prayer Network in collaboration with the international foundation ACN (Aid to the Church in Need).

To make the sign of the cross, read the Bible, go to church on Sundays, talk about Jesus, pray the rosary – for us, these are normal and everyday things. However, this is not the case in many parts of the world. Any one of these can lead to exclusion, imprisonment in a work camp or even death.

The year began with an attack carried out on Jojo Cathedral in the Philippines during Holy Mass; 23 people were killed. Forty missionaries were murdered worldwide in 2018, 35 of these were priests. Two of them were massacred in late November together with 80 believers in a refugee camp in Alindao in the Central African Republic.

One also should not forget Asia Bibi, the Pakistani mother who was sentenced to death on charges of blasphemy and only released from prison after 9 years. It is estimated that more than 25 Christians are currently incarcerated on the same charges.

Also the Coptic Christians in Egypt are also under constant persecution. This calls to mind the pictures of the 21 Egyptians who were beheaded in 2015. In contrast, the murder of 33 Coptic pilgrims in 2017 and 2018 were virtually ignored.

There are thousands of cases of persecution and discrimination that go unnoticed because they are not reported by the media. In the video, Pope Francis commented, “We find it difficult to believe, but there are more martyrs today than there were in the early centuries,” because “they speak the truth and proclaim Jesus Christ,” even “in countries in which freedom and human rights are protected in theory, on paper.”

According to the Religious Freedom in the World Report of the pontifical foundation ACN, Christianity is the most persecuted religion in the world. This fundamental human right is severely threatened in 38 countries – 21 of which are even classified as countries in which persecution occurs.

“This prayer intention of the Holy Father is quite significant for the Christian community. Praying for our persecuted and discriminated brothers and sisters is one of the pillars of ACN. We support this prayer intention of the Holy Father with great joy and gratitude,” Thomas Heine-Geldern, ACN President, said.

 

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Bitter memories of time of terror for the priests in Zanzibar

Father Damas Mfoi is a Catholic priest in the semi-autonomous archipelago of Zanzibar of the coast of Tanzania. Zanzibar is predominantly Muslim with a small Christian population. Since 2010, Father Mfoi has been a parish priest on the main island of Unguja. In 2012, the otherwise peaceful island community witnessed a series of violent attacks on religious leaders. A Muslim cleric was burned with acid in the fall of that year; a Catholic priest suffered gunshot wounds on Christmas Day 2012, and another was shot to death the following February. At the time, leaflets were distributed to incite violence, some of which bore the stamp of the radical Islamist group Uamsho. However, responsibility for the attacks has yet to be claimed or officially assigned. Father Mfoi tells Aid to the Church in Need about the time of terror:

“It was Christmas 2012, and we had planned to go for supper until we heard that Father Ambrose had been shot. Church leaders were in a state of shock, and we could no longer have our shared meal. We were frightened. We rushed to the hospital, but cautiously, as it was announced via leaflets that Church leaders would be killed, and that churches would be destroyed.

“When we arrived, Father Ambrose was still bleeding, and he couldn’t talk. The following day, he was flown to Dar es Salaam for further treatment. After that, it was our faith that kept us here. People on the mainland called us home, but as Christians committed to the Gospel, we knew from the very beginning that ours was a mission of suffering, and that our lives might be threatened. There was no running away.

“More leaflets were distributed, saying that Muslims should not allow the sale of alcohol, or the presence of churches. They were published anonymously, but today we know who they are. We didn’t know what would happen, though some said that they were just idle threats. But less than three months later, Father Evaristus Mushi was struck, and tragedy befell us.

“It was a Sunday morning at 7:15 A.M.; I was saying Mass in a small church. A non-Catholic neighbor came running in; he shouted, “Father Damas, I have something to tell you!” He told me that Father Mushi was dead, the victim of a shooting. Some man shot him that morning, when he was parked in front of his church. I drove to the other churches to say Mass; now that Father Mushi was dead, I had to carry out the mission of Christ alone.

“News of Father Mushi’s death rippled throughout the community, but that wasn’t the end of it. After we buried him and paid our last respects, a group of women came to our gates, crying. I told them, ‘Don’t cry now. Father Mushi is in heaven.’ One replied, ‘Father, she is not crying over Father Mushi. She is crying because of you.’ The assailants targeted me because I had built too many churches.

“The next morning, I escaped to the mainland, and a month later, I returned. I thought to myself, ‘There is no abandoning our mission. Jesus wouldn’t want to see us fail. There are Christians still here—why should their leaders run?’

“Upon my return, I found that the police had set up a command post within my compound, and over the next two years, they patrolled the area because of the tension that lingered. The government took good care of us, but we knew, above all, that God protected us. When I was offered a bodyguard, I refused, believing that the work of Jesus did not require a machine gun; He promised his people that he would be with us until the end of time.

“Six or seven months passed, and for a while, we thought that the worst was over, though security was still tight. But come September, a priest had acid splashed on him as he was leaving his regular café. He survived the attack but sustained major injuries.

“There is no recovering from what’s happened, and since the assailants might still be active, we aren’t completely safe. But through all these problems, we continue our interfaith work. We talk to people in the community, and we tell them that we believe God created us all and gave us the freedom to believe in whatever way we were taught. Muslims are taught about Muhammad; Christians are taught about Jesus Christ. We should all do our best to respect that and avoid mixing politics with religion.”

In 2017, Aid to the Church in Need supported the Church in Tanzania with projects totaling more than 1.7 Million Euros.

 

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ACN to “convert” the Lamborghini donated by the Pope into a nursery school and a centre for Christians in the Nineveh region

Thanks to a donation of 200,000 Euros from the Holy Father, following the auctioning of the Lamborghini that was given to him last year, ACN will be able to fund two new projects on behalf of the Iraqi Christian families and other minorities who have returned to their homes on the Nineveh Plains.

On 15 November 2017 the Holy Father decided to give ACN part of the proceeds from the auctioning of the Lamborghini Hurricane that had been donated to him by the famous Italian carmaker. Now ACN will give concrete form to the Pope’s gesture by funding the reconstruction of two buildings of the Syriac Catholic Church, destroyed by the war. They are the nursery school (kindergarten) of Our Lady and the multipurpose centre of the parish of the same name.

Both buildings are in the village of Bashiqa, just 30 km from Mosul. The village was badly damaged during the war, but the Christian community has returned, and in large numbers. In fact by now 405 of the 580 homes that were destroyed here have already been rebuilt and around 50% of the Christians, or 1,585 people, have already returned.

 

Reconstruction of totally destroyed multipurpose hall of St Mary, Bashiqa 

 

Reconstruction of totally destroyed multipurpose hall of St Mary, Bashiqa 

 

The two projects funded with the money from the Lamborghini will also benefit the other minorities in the town, since the multipurpose centre, which has capacity for over 1,000 people, will be used for weddings and the religious feasts of all the various different communities. It will be the largest such centre in the area and will be available for use to over 30,000 people of all different faiths and ethnic groups.

Just a little over two years since the liberation of the villages of the Nineveh Plains, the number of Christians who have been able to return to their homes has exceeded even the most optimistic predictions. By 11 January this year at least 9108 families had returned to their villages, or almost 46% of the 19,832 families dwelling there in 2014 prior to the arrival of so-called Islamic State. This is thanks above all to the immense work of reconstruction – to which ACN has greatly contributed – that has made it possible so far to rebuild or repair some 41% of the 14,035 homes destroyed or damaged by IS.

This intervention, in which the pontifical foundation ACN has played a major role in collaboration with the local Churches, has also found a generous benefactor in the person of the Holy Father. Already back in 2016 Pope Francis gave 100,000 Euros in support of the “Saint Joseph Charity Clinic” in Erbil, which provides free medical assistance.

This most recent gift by the Holy Father will be a further help to local Christians, enabling them to live their own faith and offer a future in Iraq to their children. At the same time it is a powerful message and an invitation to peaceful coexistence between the different religions in a region where fundamentalism has sadly done grave damage to interreligious relations.

Since 2014 and up to the present day ACN has given over 14 million Euros for the support of Iraqi Christians.

 

ACN International

 

 

House repair plan offers fresh hopes to Christians

Homs reconstruction committee “critical” to regrowth of Christian community

AN action plan to enable thousands of Christians to return to their homes in the Syrian city of Homs was agreed in a house-repair scheme involving Church leaders and a leading Catholic charity.

At the meeting in Homs, the leaders of five Church communities signed the Homs Reconstruction Committee agreement, in which Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need will repair 300 homes as part of the first stage of the plan.

In the second phase, a further 980 homes are due to be rebuilt – 80 from the Melkite Greek Catholic community, 600 Greek Orthodox and 300 belonging to Syriac Orthodox families. ACN will support part of the project.

Highlighting the significance of the agreement, ACN Middle East projects coordinator Father Andrzej Halemba said: “The agreement is one of the most critical steps forward in the recovery of the Christian community in Homs.

“The commitment to rebuild so many homes offers the light of hope for people desperate to return to the city that is one of the most important for Christians in the whole of Syria.”

Greek Orthodox Bishop Georges Abou Zakhem of Homs said: “The people need to come back to their houses but they can’t do so without the help of ACN.”

Melkite priest Father Bolos Manhal said: “I am very happy that people have this wonderful opportunity to return to their homes. They have suffered so much and for many coming home will be a dream come true.

“They have had to spend so much money renting a place to live so to have their homes rebuilt will take a huge pressure off family budgets. There are more job opportunities in the city than in the countryside so they will now be able to take advantage of them.”

ACN will be contributing a maximum of US$3,500 towards each house being repaired.

With more than 12,500 homes destroyed in Homs and 37,500 badly damaged, many Christians have been living in displacement in the nearby Valley of the Christians for up to seven years.

At the height of the conflict in 2014, there were less than 100 Christians remaining in Homs Old City and targeted attacks by Islamist extremists forced nearly 250,000 to leave.

Last year, ACN piloted a scheme to repair 100 homes belonging to Melkite and Syriac Orthodox families, of which 85 are already reoccupied and the rest due to return at the start of the new academic year in the autumn.

The 2018 Homs renovation plan was part of a scheme which has already led to the repairs of nearly 500 homes across Syria, of which many are in Aleppo.

Since the crisis in Syria began in 2011, ACN has completed 750 projects involving 150 partners.

 

ACN International

LEAH SHARIBU: ONE YEAR IN CAPTIVITY

Today, 19th February 2019 marks exactly one year since the abduction of 15-year old Leah Sharibu, one of the school girls taken hostage by Boko Haram Terrorists from Dapchi in Maiduguri, North East Nigeria.

Leah Sharibu is a 15-year old Nigerian girl. She was abducted when Boko Haram stormed a boarding school in the town of Dapchi, Diocese of Maiduguri in north-eastern Nigeria on 19th February 2018 kidnapping 110 school girls.

 

Speaking with Aid to the Church in Need (ACN), Reverend Gideon Para-Mallam who is the family guardian and spokesman of the Sharibu family said of the current situation:

Mother Rebecca Sharibu with Fr. Gideon Para-Mallam in a Press Conference recently. Fr. Gideon is the guardian and spokesman of the Sharibu family).

 

“I have just finished speaking with Leah’s Parents, Nathan and Rebecca Sharibu. And then prayed with both of them. The parents are strong in Christ but one could feel the pain in their heart. My own heart is heavy too. I told them the efforts of all Christians worldwide including Aid to the Church in Need (ACN) .They personally asked me to thank all who are standing with them, both local and international.”

Also speaking, Leah’s Father, Nathan Sharibu sighed, “We will not give up. We are strong in Christ” and agreeing with him, her mother Rebecca Sharibu added, “God is able to keep us and bring Leah back, so to give up is not an option”.

Reverend Para-Mallam described Leah as the heroine of the Christian faith in the 21st Century, an icon of the Christian faith for the younger generation and  a symbol of faith resilience emerging from North Eastern Nigeria- a people who have suffered persecution for so long.

“God is making a powerful statement through the captivity and courage of Leah Sharibu. Christianity can never be destroyed by Boko Haram or any force on earth: spiritual or physical – temporal or long-term”, the evangelical pastor said.

“The God of justice reigns”, he emphasized, “ Boko Haram will not escape God’s divine justice and intervention on Leah’s behalf and others in captivity”.

Rev. Para-Mallam prayed for the release of not only Leah but through her, other several unknown captives – Muslims and Christians alike – who are being held captive by the deadly terrorist group, Boko Haram.

“My appeal and question to Boko Haram is – Where is your humanity? Imagine if Leah were your daughter, would you like what you are doing to her? Against her will and consent? God never forces any one to convert!”, he said.

 

ACN International

Christians in Burkina Faso are becoming increasingly fearful for their lives

The murder of a missionary in Burkina Faso reflects the alarming situation into which the country is sliding

“Their vehicle was returning from a meeting in Togo when, just a few kilometres after the frontier, they were ambushed by terrorists who had just murdered four policemen and burned down a customs post. The armed men stopped the vehicle and forced the passengers to disembark. Then they took the priest to one side and shot him in the head.” This was the account of Father Jacob Lompo, the bursar for the diocese of Fada N’Gourma, who was speaking to the international Catholic pastoral charity and pontifical foundation Aid to the Church in Need (ACN International) about the murder of the Spanish missionary Father Antonio Cesar Fernández.

The attack took place on Friday 15 February when this 72-year-old Spanish priest was returning to Burkina Faso together with two other Salesian religious – both of whom escaped unharmed from the attack.

“It is the first time that something like this has happened in this area. They have never experienced anything of the kind before. But it is undoubtedly true that we have recently seen worrying activities by gangs of bandits and terrorists”, said a source close to ACN, which prefers to remain anonymous . “There are areas bordering on the diocese of Tenkodogo and Fada N’Gourma where it is no longer possible to celebrate Holy Mass, because in some of the villages there have been abductions and hostagetakings.”

The murder of this priest is just one more misfortune in the tragic chain of events that is afflicting the country. According to Father Lompo, in the diocese of Fada N’Gourma “a number of communities and churches have been forced to close down because jihadist groups have been going through the villages threatening the inhabitants and demanding that they convert to Islam.”

“Many of the Christians are terrified and have fled. The parish priest has had to go looking for his catechists, who have been intimidated, and relocate them to other, safer places. A congregation of religious sisters has also had to move because of the danger”, he told ACN.

This climate of fear is affecting above all the north, the east and the Sahel zone where, according to Father Lompo, “600 state schools have had to close down on account of the terrorist threats.”

“The most alarming reports in recent months have come to us from the diocese of Fada N’Gourma and above all from the frontier region with Niger, where the insecurity is acute, especially in the forest region. So this recent attack and the murder of Father Antonio Cesar in the south of the country, closer to the border with Ghana and Togo, is really worrying”, says Rafael D’Aqui, ACN’s section head with responsibility for the projects in Burkina Faso.

“From a geographical point of view, the problem of insecurity and radicalisation that initially existed on the border with Mali has then extended towards the east, to the border with Niger, and in the last year also to the southeast of the country – for example in the areas close to Pama, where we had already had reports in the past of radicalisation, and of insecurity among the Christian community. But the murder of this Salesian priest on Friday took place some 130 km from there. It seems as though the terrorists and guerrilla fighters are trying to encircle the frontiers of Burkina Faso. This is something new and it is really alarming”, Mr D’Aqui explained.

“What is especially shocking is the fact that they should murder in this way a priest and religious who has given his life to bring about development and worked with the young people, a man who loved this country where the social work of the Catholic Church in education and healthcare has brought major benefits to everyone, and not just to the Christians. It saddens me greatly, for this attack is not simply on the life of a single person but on all the country”, added D’Aqui, who recently travelled to Burkina Faso to visit some of the projects supported by ACN. And concludes: “We have to pray for peace and for an end to this situation, which is creating a psychosis that is harmful for the country”.

 

 

Russia: Ecumenical conference held on the third anniversary of the historic meeting between Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill

An international ecumenical conference with prominent attendees was held on 12 February in Moscow to celebrate the third anniversary of the historic meeting between Pope Francis and Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill, which took place on 12 February 2016 in the Cuban capital of Havana.

The event was hosted by the chairman of the Department of External Church Relations of the Moscow Patriarchate, Metropolitan Hilarion of Volokolamsk. The Vatican was represented by the President of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, Cardinal Kurt Koch, and the President of the Pontifical Academy for Life, Archbishop Vincenzio Paglia. The conference was attended by further dignitaries of both churches, including the Apostolic Nuncio to the Russian Federation, and international experts.

The theme of the conference was “Death and Dying in a Technological Society”, with a special focus on the issue of euthanasia. Each year, the anniversary of the meeting in Havana is celebrated by an event dedicated to one of the issues that were included in the joint declaration of the two church leaders as challenges that both churches are facing and for which a joint solution needs to be found.

The pontifical foundation Aid to the Church in Need (ACN) was represented at the conference by the head of the organisation’s Russia section, Peter Humeniuk. ACN has been working to establish a dialogue between the Catholic and Russian Orthodox churches for over 25 years and, in response to the joint declaration of the pope and patriarch, has founded an ecumenical working group to “realise the closer cooperation between the two churches that both church leaders have called for,” explained Humeniuk, who is himself a member of the working group. “It is imperative that the document does not remain merely a piece of paper, but is put into practice in real life. After all, these are the crucial questions of our time that we urgently require an answer for. For this reason, we are supporting ecumenical initiatives that, for example, address the protection of human life from conception to natural death and provide pastoral care for people with addiction or with psychological disorders or assistance for mothers in crisis situations. We are also looking for ways to work together to help persecuted Christians in the Middle East,” Humeniuk continued.

One of the speakers at the conference in Moscow was Archpriest orthodox Aleksandr Tkachenko, the founder and head of a children’s hospice project that was initiated in 2003 in the eparchy of Saint Petersburg. ACN has supported the project from the very beginning; it provides palliative, pedagogical and pastoral care to terminally ill children and assistance for their family members. During the conference, Archpriest Tkachenko publicly thanked ACN for its support.

 

ACN International

Photo credit: patriarchia.ru / Moscow Patriarchate

Syria: A homecoming never to be forgotten

Christian families in Syria forced from their town by extremists celebrated their return yesterday (Thursday, 14th February) with a ceremony marking the reconstruction of their homes.

At the service, parishioners packed into St Mary’s Church, in Krak des Chevaliers (Al Husn) village, and received ‘Jesus is my Rock’ stone tablets and bottles of holy water to signify the completion of repairs to houses devastated during a two-year campaign of violence at the height of the war.

Presiding at the ceremony, Greek Catholic Melkite Archbishop Nicolas Sawaf of Lattakia, thanked Aid to the Church in Need, which funded the programme to repair 55 houses.

He said: “Given everything that the people have suffered, the violence and the hatred, who would have thought these houses would be constructed?

“For me it is a dream and my sincere thanks to Aid to the Church in Need.”

Reflecting on how neighbours were implicated in the attacks on the Christian homes, he added: “We must remember we as Christian citizens of Syria have a special mission of love, compassion and reconciliation. We should not hate our enemies, we should forgive them.”

Presenting the ‘Jesus of my Rock’ tablets to representatives of each family, Father Andrzej Halemba, ACN Middle East projects coordinator, said: “These tablets will remind you that you are not alone, that God is always with you and that the friends and benefactors of ACN are always praying and supporting you.”

Among those who received a tablet was Hasan Marmari, 60, who returned to his home a few weeks ago after ACN completed repairing it.

Mr Marmari, who described how his son, George, went missing five years ago during military service, said: “Of course there is still so much pain and suffering for so many of us but to be finally back home and able to re-start our lives is a huge step forward and an important sign of hope.”

The Christian area of Krak des Chevaliers village came under attack in 2012 when extremists, including Muslims in the district, turned on them as part of the rebels’ campaign to take the nearby medieval Crusader castle, of crucial strategic significance as they sought to gain a stranglehold over the region.

As well as repairing the houses, ACN restored St Mary’s Church, which dates back 900 years and which was badly attacked and desecrated during the violence.

Since the conflict began in 2011, the charity has completed nearly 750 projects in Syria, such as emergency help for displaced Christian families in the Valley of the Christians, which includes Krak des Chevaliers village.

 

ACN International

Pakistan: “My husband is innocent!” – The “Asia Bibi’s” the world knows nothing about

In Pakistan, 224 Christians have been victims of the blasphemy law since the law’s passage in 1986, Cecil Shane Chaudhry, Executive Director of the National Commission for Justice and Peace (NCJP) of Pakistan, told a delegation from Aid to the Church in Need (ACN) during a visit to the Asian country.

Although the legal case against Asia Bibi finally came to a positive resolution on January 29th, 23 Christians were killed for blasphemy accusations between 1990 and 2017 and the Commission has documented a further 25 cases of Christians under trial, according to a study presented to ACN.

Specifically, there are two paragraphs of Section 295 of the Pakistani Penal Code (paragraphs B and C) that can be understood as the “anti-blasphemy law”. Section 295B stipulates a life sentence for anyone who desecrates the Quran, while insulting the Prophet Muhammed carries the death sentence under Section 295C.

“The anti-blasphemy law is a powerful tool that fundamentalists can wield to the detriment of minorities and is often misused as a means for personal revenge,” Chaudhry said. “And when charges are brought against Christians, the entire community suffers the consequences.”

This is exactly what happened in March of 2013 in Joseph Colony, a Christian district in Lahore, after the young Christian Sawan Masih was accused of having insulted Muhammad. “On 9 March, after Friday prayers, a mob of 3000 Muslims burnt down the entire district, destroying almost 300 houses and two churches,” Father Emmanuel Yousaf, NCJP President, explained to the delegation from ACN during a visit to the residential area. The district has in the meantime been rebuilt thanks to funding from the government and returned to the Christians.

While the 83 instigators of the arson attack have all been released, Sawan Masih was sentenced to death in 2014 and is still waiting for the appeal proceedings to be held. “The hearings are constantly being postponed,” attorney Tahir Bashir explained. “The last hearing was scheduled for 28 January, but the judge did not appear. A new court date has now been set for 27 February.”

Just as in the case of Asia Bibi, there are a lot of irregularities in Sawan’s case. The charges against him were brought by one of his Muslim friends, Shahid Imran, following an argument between the two men. Only two days later, two witnesses appeared who in reality had not even been present at the time Muhammed was allegedly insulted. “The charges against Sawan are being exploited,” Father Yousaf told ACN. “The true motivation behind this is an attempt to drive Christians out of this city district. It has become very popular because it lies very close to the steel factories.”

In the meantime, Sawan’s wife Sobia is raising their three children all by herself. “I don’t know why they have accused my husband,” she said to ACN. “I just know that the man who brought charges against him was a friend of his with whom he had quarrelled. Sawan is innocent!”

 

ACN International